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Sunday, 12 June 2016

In one Hamburg school migrant children who speak little German are terrorizing children from native German families

All those “refugees” that Germany has been welcoming with open arms are enriching German culture in unexpected ways. In one Hamburg school, migrant children who speak little or no German are terrorizing children from native German families.
Many thanks to Nash Montana for translating this article from Bergedorfer Zeitung:
Integration Problems
“The mood is coming to a tipping point”
[Photo caption: A group of rude refugee children are bullying students at the Gemeinschaftsschule. Concerned parents are now informing politicians.]
Contusions, bruises and even one laceration — a group of about 15 refugee children are bullying their co-students.
Schwarzenbek. 78 children from refugee families are at this time educated in so-called DaZ-classes [Deutsch als Zweitsprache = German as a second language] at this interdenominational school. One small group — parents speak of about ten to fifteen children; the headmaster Andreas Hartung speaks of eight to ten children — attract attention by exhibiting extremely rude and violent behavior.
Parents complain on Facebook
Danny Frank blew off steam on the social network Facebook last Thursday: When his daughter tried to help her friend, she was beaten by members of said group. The result: one laceration, contusions and a lot of pain. Frank’s description ignited a discussion, in which multiple other parents then told of similar experiences by their children — some on their way to school, some in the schoolyard.
Complaints during Resident Q&A session
Thursday night three families used the Resident Q&A by the City Council to submit their concerns. The mother Jacky Geske reported on her daughter, who is afraid of her school. As she was telling about her daughter, the room was moved and the around 40 visitors and politicians showed massive approval as they applauded her.
Principal is asking for patience
The principal, Andreas Hartung, didn’t even try to play down these problems, but he asked the parents for a little more patience: “Give us time.” It’s only been two weeks since the school took on a new educator whose sole concern is social integration. This week he already spoke with several parents of said obtrusive children from the lower elementary level.
But they are looking for a translator. And in the coming week there are more talks planned with the parents of children from the upper elementary.


Education act also applies to refugees
Furthermore, Hartung has clarified with the office of the district school department that the education act does indeed apply to refugee children as well. In paragraph 25, possible regulatory measures are listed, and among them is the expulsion from school. Hartung even went so far as to say: “Children cannot be told to go to school with fear in their heart. If nothing else works, then I will clarify whether the possibility exists to influence the process for a residency permit.”
Comments partially racist
In light of recent racist comments on the internet, Christoph Ziehm, the former speaker of the Round Table Welcome Culture, says that the mood in the city is at a tipping point: “it’s terrible that the offenses of individuals are being attributed to an entire group.” At the same time Ziehm can see a huge problem within the integration of these refugees into society: “Concerning the comprehension of equal status for men and women, Syrian families are limping 50 years behind us, Afghan families even 80 years.”

Via Gates of Vienna

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