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Saturday, 12 January 2013

The Fake Legends of Adolf Hitler’s “Jewish Grandfather”-final chapter (part III)

In place of Langer‟s failed rumors, Waite posits another false story of a different “Jewish grandfather” that had also been “circulating” for years, to wit that Hitler's paternal grandmother had been working as a cook in the household of a Jewish man named Leopold Frankenberger before she gave birth to Hitler's father out of wedlock.
But Hitler had worried that he might be blackmailed over a Jewish grandfather and ordered his private lawyer, Hans Frank, to investigate his paternal lineage. Frank told the Fuehrer that his grandmother had become pregnant while working as a domestic servant in a Jewish household in Graz.
The facts of this matter are in dispute—and a very lengthy dispute it has been. The point of overriding psychological and historical importance is not whether it is true that Hitler had a Jewish grandfather, but whether he believed that it might be true.Waite then lies when he writes: "He did so believe and the fact shaped both his personality and his public policy."
No, Hitler did not believe it, and in fact Hans Frank‟s entire story is false, an invention made up in the mind of a condemned man under pressure to “clear his conscience.” There was no blackmail letter from Hitler‟s nephew Patrick and there was no Frankenberger family living in Graz.
The American Jewish psychologist G. M. Gilbert was sent to Europe as a military intelligence officer and was appointed prison psychologist for the German prisoners. He later wrote in his book Nuremberg Diary on p.19: “He [Hans Frank] and Albert Speer were the only defendants to show any true remorse for their war crimes …” He should also have said they were the only two who spoke ill of Adolf Hitler in retrospect, the former in hopes to clear himself before God, the latter in hopes to clear his reputation before his new earthly rulers.
HITLER’S TRUE GENEALOGY
These are the principal blood relatives of Adolf Hitler:
Maria Schicklgruber, paternal grandmother
Johann Georg Hiedler, presumed, official paternal grandfather
Johann Nepomuk Hüttler, real paternal grandfather and maternal great-grandfather
Johann Baptist Põlzl, maternal grandfather
Klara Hitler, mother
Alois Hitler, father
Paula Hitler, sister
Alois Hitler, Jr., half-brother (by his father‟s 2nd wife)
Angela Hitler Raubal, half-sister (by father‟s 2nd wife)
Geli Raubal, niece (through his half-sister Angela)
Leo Raubal Jr, nephew (through his half-sister Angela)
William Patrick Hitler, nephew (through his half-brother Alois, Jr)
Below is an accurate genealogic chart from Familypedia.com. The only addition that needs to be made is to link Maria Anna Schicklgruber and Johann Nepomuk Hüttler as having an extra-marital liason which resulted in the child Alois Schicklgruber in 1837 (see Werner Maser, below). But in all other aspects, it conforms to the research done and accepted by all historians and genealogists. There are no Jews or Jewish connections at all.Werner Maser, a German historian and author of several serious books on Hitler, was described in his obituary in the London Times as “one of the first German historians to treat the Nazi period as a field of academic research.”5
This is borne out in his exceedingly thorough job of tracing Adolf Hitler‟s family background and lineage in his book, Hitler: Legend, Myth and Reality, published in German in 1971, in English in 1973. He concludes that Hitler‟s paternal grandfather was Johann Nepomuk Hüttler, a German farmer living in Spital, in the Waldviertel region in the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
This book and the information it contains has been available for 40 years, yet conspiracy theorists who want to believe Hitler was a Rothschild or simply a part-Jew ignore it. Maser‟s investigation included personal trips to look through church and baptismal records, interviewing relatives, heirs, school-fellows and childhood friends. In the attic of one of Hitler‟s cousins, he discovered material which biographers had been seeking for half a century, including large numbers of letter and notes in Hitler‟s own hand.It is undisputed that Adolf Hitler was born to Alois Hitler and Klara Pölzl. Alois, however, was born Schicklgruber because his mother, Maria Anna Schicklgruber was unmarried. [Not an unusual occurrence in Austrian villages at that time.]Maria Anna Schicklgruber was not a poor housemaid who worked for wealthy Jewish families. The daughter of Johann Schicklgruber, a prosperous farmer in possession of a well-appointed farm in the village of Strones, and Theresia Pfseisinger, she was born in 1795 and is described by Maser as a thrifty, reserved and exceptionally shrewd peasant woman. She gives every appearance of having been strong-minded, a trait that was passed down to her son Alois and her grandson, Adolf.
3. Maria Anna Schicklgruber‟s brother, Jakob, purchased the family farm from his father for 3000 gulden when the father was only 53 years old. Maria‟s mother, Theresia, had just inherited 210 gulden from her father‟s total estate of 1054 gulden, so the parents felt prosperous enough to retire. To put the value of 3000 gulden in perspective: a cow at that time could be purchased for 10 to 12 gulden; a brood sow cost 4 gulden; a bed w/bedding was 2 gulden; an inn with stabling could be had for 450 to 500 gulden. As you can see, 3000 gulden was a substantial amount.
4. Maria Anna, at the age of 26, inherited 74.25 gulden at the death of her mother in 1821. She kept this sum in the Orphans‟ Fund until 1838, earning 5% interest. By then, it had increased to 165 gulden, over double the original amount. Her son was not born until June 1837 when she was 42 yrs. old.
5. She refused to reveal the name of her child‟s father, even though the priest wanted her to do so. Thus, the child could only be given her name. This strong-willed woman did marry, in 1842—five years after the birth of her son—a man named Johann Georg Hiedler of the village of Spital. If he were the father of Alois, Maria Anna would certainly have named him such when they married and legitimized her son, but she did not. That entry was made in the baptismal register at Döllersheim where they married, but not until ten years after her death! The one responsible for it was Hiedler‟s younger brother, Johann Nepomuk Hüttler, in whose household young Alois went to live at the age of 5 years, after his mother‟s marriage to Hiedler.6
6. So … we have Maria Anna Schicklgruber Heidler‟s illegitimate son Alois going to live in the household of his new stepfather‟s brother—his „uncle.‟ Maser explains it this way: Hiedler, at this time 50 years old and never before married, may have resented and/or been irritated by the presence of a young child who was not his. But more likely, Johann Nepomuk, a much younger 35 years old, who was married at the time Alois was conceived, could now welcome his son, as „nephew,‟ into his family without his wife becoming suspicious.
7. All reports are, according to Maser, that Alois was happy in his „uncle‟s‟ home where he had „cousins‟ and a more lively family life than he experienced living with his 47-year-old mother and her new husband.
8. Maria Anna Hiedler died in 1847 at the age of only 52. Alois did not, on his own initiative, seek legal legitimacy. His birth status did not hamper his career, in which he rose to what was considered the very respectable position of a Customs official; nor did it appear to trouble him personally. He was known as a tolerant, modern thinker, not particularly religious. His second wife Franziska Matzelsberger had a son born out of wedlock when he married her and he accepted this son in his household. It wasn‟t until sometime between 1874 and 1876 that he changed his name to Hitler. Hitler is almost identical in sound to Hüttler.
9. It was in 1876 that Franz Schicklgruber, administrator of his sister Maria Anna‟s estate, made over to his nephew Alois 230 gulden. It was now that Alois signed his name “Hitler,” spelling it just slightly differently than Hüttler. Maser comments that the Schicklgruber family was no doubt proud of how well Alois had done for himself and saw to it that he got the bulk of the inheritance of his mother.
10. Rothschild and Frankenberger Jew paternity is ruled out on the grounds of there being no evidence Maria Anna Schicklgruber ever worked for a Jewish family in Graz or Vienna.
11. The Jew Frankenberger story: Hans Frank, who became Govenor General of Poland from 1939 to 1945, is responsible for the false story, with the help of an American army chaplain Sixtus O‟Conner, written before Frank was put to death by the Nuremberg IMT [International Military Tribunal]. He concocted a story that Maria Anna Schicklgruber worked as a cook in the household of a Jewish family in Graz, Austria at the time she gave birth to her son. In his „report,‟ this family had a 19 yr-old son. [Remember, MAS was 42 years old, a fact of which Hans Frank was probably ignorant.] Further, he said the family, named Frankenberger, paid a maintenance allowance to Maria Anna for 14 years [which makes Jews look responsible and honorable]. But the story is false from start to finish. Some of the main reasons are:A) From the end of the 15th Century until a decade after Maria Anna died, no Jews lived in Graz. They had been expelled by Emperor Maximilian I in 1496 from the province of Styria, which included Graz. In 1781, under Joseph II, they were allowed to re-enter, but only for a few weeks at a time, during Lent and at the Feast of St. Giles to the annual Fairs, after paying a fixed sum. Two years later, these rights were again curtailed, and it remained enforced until 1860 that no Jews whatsoever could even enter the province.
B) No resident by the name of Frankenberger is listed as having lived in Graz at that time.
C) Records from 1821 to 1838 pertaining to Maria Anna‟s money in the Orphans‟ Fund showed no change of address in 1836 or ‟37. Moreover, as a subject of the “Lordship of Ottenstein” she could not have absented herself for any length of time without it being noted.
D) Frank wrote in his report that Adolf Hitler told him in a conversation that he knew there were no Jews in his family because he had talked with his father and grandmother about it. But Hitler could not have said that—his grandmother had been dead since before he was born! This shows that Hans Frank‟s story is made up out of whole cloth—including the part about “investigating the matter for Hitler.”
12. The Rothschild in Vienna story: This is debunked for the same reasons. Maria Anna Schicklgruber did not visit or live in Vienna, and there is no record of who these Rothschilds were, their address or other necessary information.
13, Patrick Hitler: Another rumor of an alleged newspaper article in the Paris-Soir in which Hitler‟s nephew [by his half-brother Alois, Jr.], Patrick, described his uncle Adolf as the grandson of a Graz Jew called Frankenreither. Maser dug up this issue of that defunct newspaper while on a trip to Paris and found it carried two pages and six illustrations of Patrick Hitler‟s story, but no allusion whatsoever to any Jewish antecedents.
COMMENTS AND OTHER FINDINGS BY WERNER MASER
1. Maser feels that Johann Nepomuk Hüttler and Alois decided on the change of name in compliance with the wishes of Maria Anna. The inheritance was given in the same year that Alois wrote his name as Hitler. The baptismal record continues to name Johann Georg Hiedler as Alois‟ father, but Alois chose to spell the name as Hitler.
2. Klara Pölzl, Alois 3rd wife, mother of Adolf, was a granddaughter of Johann Nepomuk Hüttler and his wife Eva Maria [Decker], making her the niece of her husband Alois. She was considered his niece because Alois was a Schicklgruber and Klara was a Decker on the maternal side. Hüttler died in 1888, Adolf was born in 1889.
3. Adolf Hitler‟s maternal grandfather was Johann Baptist Põlzl, a farmer living in Spital. His paternal grandfather was Johann Nepomuk Hüttler, also a Spital farmer. Maser says that there is a distinct family resemblance between all the relations in Spital who are descended from Hüttler, and some of them bear a strong resemblance to Adolf Hitler. Hitler visited Spital in 1905, 1906 and 1908, and several times when on leave during the First World War. He knew his relatives and a great deal about his family history.

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