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Saturday, 7 January 2012

The Jewish Role in the Early Soviet Regime

From Robert Wilton's, "The Last Days of the Romanovs"

Published 1920 (American and British 1920 editions did not include this list), 1921, 1923, and 1993 by the Institute for Historical Review.

According to data furnished by the Soviet press, out of 556 important functionaries of the Bolshevik state, in 1918-19 there were 17 Russians, two Ukrainians, eleven Armenians, 35 Latvians, 15 Germans, one Hungarian, ten Georgians, three Poles, three Finns, one Czech, one Karaim, and 457 Jews.

Ministry Name Nationality
Chairman V.I. Ulyanov (in actuality, part Jewish) Russian
Foreign Affairs G.V. Chicherin Georgian
Nationalities J. Dzhugashvili (Stalin) Georgian
Agriculture Protian Armenian
Economic Council Lourie (Larin) Jew
Food Supply A.G. Schlikhter Jew
Army and Navy L.D. Bronstein (Trotski) Jew
State Control K.I. Lander Jew
State Lands Kaufmann Jew
Works (Labor) V. Schmidt Jew
Social Relief E. Lilina (Knigissen) Jew
Education A. Lunacharsky Russian
Religion Spitzberg Jew
Interior Apfelbaum (Radomyslski) Jew
" (Zinoviev) Jew
Hygiene Anvelt Jew
Finance I.E. Gukovs (and G. Sokolnikov) Jews
Press Voldarski (Goldstein) Jew
Elections M.S. Uritsky Jew
Justice I.Z. Shteinberg Jew
Refugees Fenigstein Jew
" Savitch (Assistant) Jew
" Zazslovski (Assistant) Jew

Out of these 22 "Sovnarkom" members, Wilton summed up, there were three Russians, one Georgian, one Armenian, and 17 Jews.

The Central Executive Committee, Wilton continues, was made up of the following members:

Y.M. Sverdlov (Solomon) (Chairman) Jew
Avanesov (Secretary) Armenian
Bruno Latvian
Breslau Latvian (?)
Babtchinski Jew
N.I. Bikharin Russian
Weinberg Jew
Gailiss Jew
Ganzberg (Ganzburg) Jew
Danichevski Jew
Starck German
Sachs Jew
Scheinmann Jew
Erdling Jew
Landauer Jew
Linder Jew
Wolach Czech
S. Dimanshtein Jew
Encukidze Georgian
Ermann Jew
A.A. Ioffe Jew
Karkhline Jew
Knigissen Jew
Rosenfeld (Kamenev) Jew
Apfelbaum (Zinoviev) Jew
N. Krylenko Russian
Krassikov Jew
Kaprik Jew
Kaoul Latvian

Ulyanov (Lenin) Russian
Latsis Jew
Lander Jew
Lunacharsky Russian
Peterson Latvian
Peters Latvian
Roudzoutas Jew
Rosine Jew
Smidovitch Jew
Stoutchka Latvian
Nakhamkes (Steklov) Jew
Sosnovski Jew
Skrytnik Jew
L. Bronstein (Trotsky) Jew
Teodorovitch Jew (?)
Terian Armenian
Uritsky Jew
Telechkine Russian
Feldmann Jew
Frumkin Jew
Souriupa Ukranian
Tchavtchevadze Georgian
Scheikmann Jew
Rosental Jew
Achkinazi Imeretian (?)
Karakhane Karaim (Karaite)
Rose Jew
Sobelson (Radek) Jew
Schlichter Jew
Schikolini Jew
Chklianski Jew
Levine (Pravdine) Jew


Thus, concluded Wilton, out of 61 members, five were Russians, six were Latvians, one was a German, two were Armenians, one was a Czech, one was an Imeretian, two were Georgians, one was a Karaim, one was Ukrainian, and 41 were Jews.

The Extraordinary Commission of Moscow (Cheka)--the Soviet secret police and predecessor of the GPU, the NKVD, and the KGB--was made up of the following:

F. Dzerzhinsky (Chairman) Pole
Y. Peters (Deputy Chairman) Latvian
Chklovski Jew
Kheifiss Jew
Zeistine Jew
RazmirovitchJew
Kronberg Jew
Khaikina Jew
Karlson Latvian
Schaumann Latvian
Leontovitch Jew
Jacob Goldine Jew
Galperstein Jew
Kniggisen Jew
Katzis Latvian
Schillenkuss Jew
Janson Latvian
Rivkine Jew
Antonof Russian
Delafabre Jew
Tsitkine Jew
Roskirovitch Jew
G. Sverdlov Jew
Biesenski Jew
J. Blumkin (Count Mirbach's assassin) Jew
Alexandrovitch (Blumkin's accomplice) Russian
I. Model Jew
RoutenbergJew
Pines Jew
Sachs Jew
Daybol Latvian
Saissoune Armenian
Deylkenen Latvian
Liebert Jew
Vogel German
Zakiss Latvian
* (Brother of the president of the Central Executive)

Of these 36 Cheka officals, one was a Pole, one a German, one an Armenian, two were Russians, eight were Latvians, and 23 were Jews. "Accordingly," Wilton sums up, "there is no reason to be surprised at the preponderant role of Jews in the assassination of the Imperial family. It is rather the opposite that would have been surprising."

Source: Pages 184-190, Appendix D, of Robert Wilton's "The Last Days of the Romanovs," 1993 edition by the Institute for Historical Review.

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